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Just as household wealth varies greatly across the population, the composition of that wealth changes as well. Simply put, the person next to you at the grocery store will likely have a much different asset mix than, say,Warren Buffett.

Todays chart breaks down the differences in the composition of wealth between middle income, upper income, and ultra wealthy (top 1%) of American households to help us better understand the building blocks that make up net worth. Lets dive in.

Its no surprise that the principal residence is the cornerstone of net worth for most Americans in the middle class. For households that fall in this wide range ($0 to $471k of net worth) the combination of housing and pension accounts make up nearly 80% of total wealth on average.

Assets like stocks and mutual funds only make up about 4% of wealth in this income bracket, partially mirroring the trend of lowerstock market participationin recent years.

As we move up the income ladder, however, this situation changes quite a bit.

If a household has a net worth that ranges between $471,000 and $10.2 million, it is considered to fall in the upper income band above. This represents the 20% richest households in the U.S., minus the top 1%, which are put in a separate bracket.

For this group, the principal residence makes up a smaller slice of the wealth pie. Instead, we see a higher mix of financial assets like stocks and mutual funds, as well as business equity and real estate. Almost half of households in this group own real estate in addition to their principal residence.

As households become wealthier, we tend to see a lower share of liquid assets as compared with the other components of net worth.

In the richest 1% of households, the principal residence makes up a mere 7.6% of assets. At this stage, almost half of assets fall under the category of business equity and real estate.

Aprimeexample of this isJeff Bezos. The lions share of the Amazon founders net worth is tied to the value of his company. Another example is PresidentTrump, whose sprawling real estate empire comprises two-thirds of his estimated $3.1 billion net worth.

One of the more prominent features of the ultra rich wealth bracket is a much higher level of financial asset ownership. In fact, the top 1% of households own over 40% of stocks.

As well, this tiny group of ultra wealthy households earns 22% of total income, up from 8% in the 1970s.

Visualizing the Extreme Concentration of Global Wealth

With life expectancies increasing, will you outlive your savings? Learn how allocating more of your portfolio to equities may reduce longevity risk.

The desire to live longer and outrun death is ingrained in the human spirit. The first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, may have evendrank mercuryin his quest for immortality.

Over time, advice for living longer has become more practical: eat well, get regular exercise, seek medical advice. However, as life expectancies increase, many individuals will struggle to save enough for their lengthy retirement years.

Todays infographic comes fromNew York Life Investments, and it uncovers how holding a stronger equity weighting in your portfolio may help you save enough funds for your lifespan.

Around the world, more people are living longer.

Despite this, many people underestimate how long theyll live. Why?

Approximately 25% of variation in lifespan is a product of ancestry, but its not the only factor that matters. Gender, lifestyle, exercise, diet, and even socioeconomic status also have a large impact. Even more importantly,breakthroughs in healthcareand technology have contributed to longer life expectancies over the last century.

This is the most commonly quoted statistic. However, life expectancies rise as individuals age. This is because they have survived many potential causes of untimely death including higher mortality risks often associated with childhood.

Amid the longer lifespans and inaccurate predictions, a problem is brewing.

Currently, 35% of U.S. households do not participate in any retirement savings plan. Among those who do, the median household only has $1,100 in its retirement account.

Enterlongevity risk: many investors are facing the possibility that they will outlive their retirement savings.

So, whats the solution? One strategy lies in the composition of an investors portfolio.

One of the most important decisions an investor will make is their asset allocation.

As a guide, many individuals have referred to the 100-age rule. For example, a 40-year-old would hold 60% in stocks while an 80-year-old would hold 20% in stocks.

As life expectancies rise and time horizons lengthen, a more aggressive portfolio has become increasingly important. Today, professionals suggest a rule closer to 110-age or 120-age.

There are many reasons why investors should consider holding a strong equity weighting.

Equities deliver much higher returns than other asset classes over time. Not only do they outpace inflation by a wide margin, many alsopay dividendsthat boost performance when reinvested.

Upon retirement, an investor usually withdraws only a small percentage of their portfolio each year. This limits the downside risk of equities, even in bear markets.

Some healthy seniors are choosing to work in retirement to stay active. This means they have more earning potential, and are better equipped to recoup any losses their portfolio may experience.

Many individuals, particularly affluent investors, want to pass on their wealth to their loved ones upon their death. Given the longer time horizon, the portfolio is better equipped to ride out risk and maximize returns through equities.

Holding equities can be an exercise in psychological discipline. An investor must be able to ride out the ups and downs in the stock market.

If they can, theres a good chance they will be rewarded. By allocating more of their portfolio to equities, investors greatly increase the odds of retiring whenever they want with funds that will last their entire lifetime.

Why do stock market corrections happen, and how often does a market correction turn into a bear market? This infographic breaks it all down.

Even though the end destination is usually a bullish one, markets often take a far more scenic route to get there. Sometimes that means going off the beaten path, and other times it may mean taking a step directly backwards to get reoriented.

In investing parlance, the latter situation can be described as a market correction: a short-term duration market move between -10% and -20%.

These are significant declines that can be a gut check for investors, especially for those who havent experienced many of them in their investing careers.

Todays infographic comes to us fromFisher Investments, and it describes the anatomy of market corrections, while also visualizing much of the data around these common events.

The average market correction looks something like this:

In the current bull market, there have already been eight corrections. The most noteworthy of these went from May 21, 2015 until February 11, 2016 and resulted in a -18.9% fall in stock prices.

One of the biggest challenges created by market corrections is that they are also far from straightforward.

Corrections can be over in two weeks, or it can take almost a year for a correction to eventually revert back to a bull market. To complicate matters, there is also a chance that a correction may turn into a bear market a fundamentally-driven and sustained decline where the market dips 20% or more.

While every correction is different, data can also help paint a clearer picture: between 1980-2016 there were 36 corrections in the U.S. market, and only five of them (about 14%) resulted in longer, sustained bear markets.

The flipside of this, however, means that 86% of the time, a correction ends up just being a blip on the radar of an otherwise intact bull market.

In other words, the vast majority of corrections end up providing an opportunity for smart investors to take advantage of lower prices before a bull market continues its climb.

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